The tree was inferred using maximum likelihood analysis of aligne

The tree was inferred using maximum likelihood analysis of aligned 16S rRNA gene sequences with bootstrap values from 100 replicates. Box indicates dominant phylotype. Figure S6. Phylogenetic affiliation of the top 20 most selleck screening library abundant Proteobacteria phylotypes identified as sulfur/sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) from each biofilm: top pipe (TP, gray) and bottom pipe (BP, black). Clones were identified Trichostatin A by genus (*family) and percentage of each representative sequence in their respective libraries is provided in the brackets. The tree was inferred using maximum likelihood analysis of aligned 16S rRNA gene sequences with bootstrap values from 100 replicates. Box indicates dominant phylotype Figure

S7. Relative abundance of taxonomic groups based on MEGAN analysis of protein families associated with the sulfur pathway. Each circle is scaled logarithmically to represent the number of reads that were assigned to each taxonomic group. Wastewater biofilms: top pipe (TP, white) and bottom pipe (BP, black). EC = Enzyme Commission

number. Figure S8. Relative abundance of taxonomic groups based on MEGAN analysis of protein families associated with the nitrogen pathway. Each circle is scaled logarithmically to represent the number EPZ004777 of reads that were assigned to each taxonomic group. Wastewater biofilms: top pipe (TP, white) and bottom pipe (BP, black). EC = Enzyme Commission number. (PDF 1008 KB) References 1. USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency): State of Technology Review Report on Rehabilitation of Wastewater Collection and Water Distribution Systems. EPA/600/R-09/048. Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati,

OH; 2009. 2. USEPA (United Amrubicin States Environmental Protection Agency): Wastewater collection system infrastructure research needs. EPA/600/JA-02/226. USEPA Urban Watershed Management Branch, Edison, NJ; 2002. 3. Mori T, Nonaka T, Tazaki K, Koga M, Hikosaka Y, Noda S: Interactions of nutrients, moisture, and pH on microbial corrosion of concrete sewer pipes. Water Res 1992, 26:29–37.CrossRef 4. Vollertsen J, Nielsen AH, Jensen HS, Wium-Andersen T, Hvitved-Jacobsen T: Corrosion of concrete sewers-the kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidation. Sci Total Environ 2008, 394:162–170.PubMedCrossRef 5. Zhang L, De Schryver P, De Gusseme B, De Muynck W, Boon N, Verstraete W: Chemical and biological technologies for hydrogen sulfide emission control in sewer systems: a review. Water Res 2008, 42:1–12.PubMedCrossRef 6. Vincke E, Boon N, Verstraete W: Analysis of the microbial communities on corroded concrete sewer pipes – a case study. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2001, 57:776–785.PubMedCrossRef 7. Okabe S, Ito T, Satoh H: Sulfate-reducing bacterial community structure and their contribution to carbon mineralization in a wastewater biofilm growing under microaerophilic conditions. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2003, 63:322–334.PubMedCrossRef 8.

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